Course Descriptions

Social Studies

2022-2023 Courses

Economics

Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None; REQUIRED for graduation

Students will broaden their understanding of how economic concepts apply to their everyday lives—including microeconomic and macroeconomic theory and the characteristics of mixed-market economies, the role of government in a free-enterprise system and the global economy and personal finance strategies. Throughout the course, students apply critical-thinking skills while making practical economic choices. Students also master literacy skills through rigorous reading and writing activities. Students analyze data displays and write routinely and responsively in tasks and assignments that are based on scenarios, texts, activities and examples. In more extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write full-length essays in informative and argumentative formats. Economics is designed to be a 9 weeks course.

Economics Honors

Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Must have previously taken one other honors course and completed with 80 or higher.

From creating graphs to reach equilibrium to learning to manage a bank account, students will take part in a more rigorous study of the principles and processes of economics in the American system. Students begin with an introduction of basic economic concepts then move on to an in-depth study of microeconomic principles. Students showcase their understanding of supply, demand and economic choices by completing a case study on starting a business. Students then turn to macroeconomic concepts, government policies and entrepreneurship. With this foundation, students create a proposal for public policies and programs in a small developing nation. Students continue their study by examining global economic concepts such as trade barriers and agreements. This honors course concludes with a unit on personal finance. Students will learn about topics such as taxation, financial institutions, credit and money management. Students extend their knowledge of personal financial planning by creating a successful budget. Throughout the course, economic theory is introduced, demonstrated and reinforced through real-life scenarios and examples. In assignments and project-based lessons, students learn to apply critical thinking skills while making practical economic choices. Economics is designed to be a 9 weeks course.

HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

Examining current global issues that impact our world today, this course takes a thematic approach to understanding the development of human systems, human understanding of the world and human social organization. This course will challenge students to develop geographic skills, including learning to interpret maps, analyze data and compare theories. Offering interactive content that will grow students’ understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems—from the agricultural revolution to the technological revolution—this course encourages students to analyze economic trends as well as compare global markets and urban environments.

Modern World History

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

Modern World History explores major world topics from the Empires Era, to Imperialism, to WWI to the present. The course highlights the major world religions, the growth and expansion of major empires, monarchies, the renaissance era, imperialism, revolutions, nationalism, colonization and the rise of dictators. It also highlights world wars, the post-WWII era, social justice movements and the increasing effects of globalization today. Throughout the course, students examine primary and secondary sources, including political cartoons, essays and judicial opinions. Students also sharpen their writing skills in shorter tasks and assignments and practice outlining and drafting skills by writing full informative and argumentative essays.

Psychology

Grade Level: 11, 12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the study of psychology and helps them master fundamental concepts in research, theory, and human behavior. Students analyze human growth, learning, personality, and behavior from the perspective of major theories within psychology, including the biological, psychosocial, and cognitive perspectives. From a psychological point of view, students investigate the nature of being human as they build a comprehensive understanding of traditional psychological concepts and contemporary perspectives in the field. Course components include an introduction to the history, perspectives, and research of psychology; an understanding of topics such as the biological aspects of psychology; and the stages of human development; aspects of personality and intelligence.

US Government

Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None; REQUIRED for graduation

This course provides students with a practical understanding of the principles and procedures of government. The course begins by establishing the origins and founding principles of American government. After a rigorous review of the Constitution and its amendments, students do a deeper dive into our political institutions and the political process. Lessons also introduce influential Supreme Court decisions to demonstrate the impact and importance of constitutional rights. Throughout the course, students examine primary and secondary sources, including political cartoons, essays and judicial opinions. Students also sharpen their writing skills in shorter tasks and assignments and practice outlining and drafting skills by writing full informative and argumentative essays. US Government is designed to be a 9 weeks course.

US Government Honors

Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Must have previously taken one other honors course and completed with 80 or higher.

This course provides students with a practical understanding of the principles and procedures of government. The course begins by establishing the origins and founding principles of American government. After a rigorous review of the Constitution and its amendments, students do a deeper dive into our political institutions and the political process. Lessons also introduce influential Supreme Court decisions to demonstrate the impact and importance of constitutional rights. Throughout the course, students examine primary and secondary sources, including political cartoons, essays and judicial opinions. This honors section uses multiple projects and case studies as well as informative and argumentative essays. U.S. Government is designed to be a 9 weeks course.

US History and Constitution

Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: US Government; course requires an End of Course Exam

U.S. History explores the people, places and events that shaped early United States history. This course stretches from the Era of Exploration through the Industrial Revolution, leading students toward a clearer understanding of the patterns, processes and people that have shaped U.S. history. Students begin by exploring the colonization of the New World and examining the foundations of colonial society. They will also examine the influence of social and political movements on societal change and the importance of modern cultural and political developments. As they study the early history of the United States, students will learn critical-thinking skills by examining the constitutional foundations of the U.S. government. Recurring themes such as territorial expansion, the rise of industrialization and the significance of slavery will be examined in the context of how these issues contributed to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Upon completion of this course, the End of Course Exam (EOC) will be taken.

US History and Constitution Honors

Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Must have previously taken one other honors course and completed with 80 or higher, Economics, and US Government; course requires an End of Course Exam

From the first colonial settlements through Industrialization, students will embark on a rigorous yearlong study of our nation’s history. Students will investigate the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed our country into the nation it is today. Units progress through the course by taking an in-depth look at events such as those surrounding the creation of the Constitution, the Civil War, our nation’s involvement in World War I and II as well as cultural aspects of our society. From writing about life in the colonies to analyzing landmark Supreme Court decisions, students are better equipped to compare what happened in yesterday’s world with what is going on in our modern era. Throughout this honors course, students continuously analyze primary and secondary sources relating to the period of study. Incorporating activities from other disciplines gives students the opportunity to connect history to other subjects. Students read excerpts from novels like Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle, and poetry such as “The New Colossus” by Emma Lazarus. Activities such as writing a petition and analyzing various Presidents’ speeches encourage students to perform throughout the course at a higher level. This course culminates with the state mandated End of Course Examination(EOC).

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